Author Topic: Why psychologists think differently?  (Read 1231 times)

Abraham

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Why psychologists think differently?
« on: February 24, 2017, 03:28:59 AM »
Hi guys
I have went to see a psychologist in this week. He evaluated my addiction as an end result.
When talking about withdrawal symptoms, he just quickly passed the topic. Maybe he was
right at some point, but why they do not consider porn addiction as a big issue? Have you guys
have similar situations? What do you think about?

Big H

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Re: Why psychologists think differently?
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2017, 05:19:12 AM »
I hear a lot of psychologist are completely ignorant on porn.

Berens

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Re: Why psychologists think differently?
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2017, 07:02:30 AM »
It may sound strange but maybe he himself is addicted to porn and do not want to face it. I am very interested in psychology and i read a lot of psychology books. There is a whole school of psychologists that criticize a lot actual mainstream psychology. Pornography is a real issue, and it affects human psyche worse than people think. Maybe the psychologist you are going to is not competent enough. You should make an effort to find a good psychologist. I recommend you to do some research yourself. Ask him uncomfortable questions. What do you think about pornography? Do you watch pornography? What are the negative effects of watching pornography? Serious and competent psychologist would have no problems with answering those questions. If he just wants to listen to you and give you antidepressant pills, look for another one. Really.

KroSen

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Re: Why psychologists think differently?
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2017, 03:10:07 AM »
I've dealt with this previously. There's a side of the world that don't consider porn an addiction, but more as a behavioural habit. There's a lot of research for, and a very common way of dealing with behavioural issues is via a slow weening process to bring it to a level you're happy to live with, e.g. quitting smoking (using patches, vapes/e-cigs, gums), food/obesity behaviours, alcohol even (it's one of the most harmful drugs for our bodies yet we as a culture accept it and try to just keep it at a manageable level, some decide to go cold and become alcohol free). This is effective if vigilant as it's easier for you to adapt to physically and emotionally/mentally and fit in socially, however in porn reboot terms, it just makes the reboot/rewiring process more drawn out, and in a moment of weakness you can very easily give in and just crave a bigger hit of the high.
The benefit of rebooting/rewiring in the way many do on these forums who are successful (cold-turkey/hard-mode) is that it gives your brain a whole new behavioural path to follow. However, if you continually relapse and let this just become another habit you start running into a similar problem of just looping back on yourself continually.

Ultimately there are many differing theories in psychology, as with any humanitarian science really (I'm a physiotherapist and there are very distinct camps within the field in how they each view and treat injuries and how the body reacts to them). There is so much research out there these days and too many variables in a human to be able to even A) consider them all, and let alone B) control them all and so differing results and outcomes are determined through science (there's a book called Bad Science which discusses this). We as humans due to our cognitive biases then like to pick and choose what suits the situation. So I know there's a camp of psychologists who truly believe porn to be useful for various things, such as in couple therapy to help reignite the fire in some relationships. And this does work...just as a short term fix...or some couples happily accept this as a required part of their sex life. Which in this day and age when we rely on a lot of artificial assistance (e.g. medicine, mobile phones, television as entertainment) is not really surprising.

You could say, kicking porn is to your sex life, as is the eating only pure organic home-grown food is to buying commercial products at the shop. One has a very niche sub-culture who are committed to it and aren't willing to accept the side-effects of the other, the other larger more mainstream group just prefer the convenience and are happy to live with the delayed onset consequences.

I'm not a believer in there necessarily being a right or wrong, you just have to decide on what makes sense to you and your life and which consequences you are willing to live with and which you are not. From there you just need to align yourself and seek out the people who support your view.

That's my two cents anyway. I definitely feel the consequences of porn very heavily outweigh the benefits for me. I've been in porn friendly relationships and they're a little twisted and not natural to me.

The way the psych that I was seeing viewed things didn't align with what I wanted to achieve necessarily so I moved on to seek advice from other counselors/professionals who do support the addiction notion.
I know the psych I saw is a very successful relationship/sexual health psychologist to others though where that works for them, whether it be a band-aid.

ImOnMyWay

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Re: Why psychologists think differently?
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2017, 03:30:19 PM »
@ Abraham,

I can relate to this completely. I went to a Urologist for years (10 to be exact) and the topic of P never once came up. Just "take this and take that".....Here I thought I had some issue and was ready to live my life knowing this forever. I also went to 2-3 psych's trying to figure this out. I asked every question in the book and became overly comfortable talking about my issues because I felt like the more I described, the better answers I could get in return. I finally said to my urologist I wanted the best sex psych around. That's when I finally found the person I needed to talk to. She completely turned my life around. We talked about the problems I was having from day to day as well as my "In bed problems" with my relationships. She could not have been more spot on about the issue and what I needed to do. So....here I am.

If I can say anything about this, it is to stick with your gut feeling about something. If you don't feel right, keep asking. Keep searching. Keep persevering. The answer soon shows up. I just wish this didn't take me until I was 27 to find out.

Hope this helped answer your question.

ImOnMyWay